Dr. Gregory Cajete Speaks about Indigenous Knowledge and Western Science

Indigenous Knowledge and Western SciUnknown-1ence

Dr. Gregory Cajete, Director of Native American Studies at the University of New Mexico, explains how Indigenous physicists not only observe the world, but participate in it with all his or her sensual being because everything in native thought is “alive” with energy. Cajete was speaking to an attentive audience at The Banff Centre as part of the Indigenous Knowledge and Western Science: Contrasts and Similarities event.

Dr. Gregory Cajete is a Tewa Indian from Santa Clara Pueblo, New Mexico. He is a Native American educator whose work is dedicated to honoring the foundations of indigenous knowledge in education. Dr. Cajete has served as a New Mexico Humanities scholar in ethno botany of Northern New Mexico and as a member of the New Mexico Arts Commission. In addition, he has lectured at colleges and universities in the U.S., Canada, Mexico, New Zealand, England, Italy, Japan and Russia. Dr. Cajete has authored five books and received several fellowships and academic distinctions.

Currently, he is Director of Native American Studies and an Associate Professor in the Division of Language, Literacy and Socio cultural Studies in the College of Education at the University of New Mexico. He worked at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico for 21 years. While at the Institute, he served as Dean of the Center for Research and Cultural Exchange, Chair of Native American Studies and Professor of ethno science. Dr. Cajete also designs culturally-responsive curricula geared to the special needs and learning styles of Native American students.

About dmfindlay

I am currently enrolled in the Master of Education program at SFU focussing on Contemplative Inquiry and Approaches in Education. This blog outlines my journey over the next 2 years
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